I’ve Got a Plan for reInvent 2017. Do You?

By Maish Saidel-Keesing
I am no IT conference novice. I’ve attended several VMworld events over the years (last year, together with over 25,000 other IT professionals). But even though I’ve been in this business for quite a while — since the days when cloud was known as “virtualization” — I haven’t been to re:Invent before.
This year, I knew it was time.
Over the years, as virtualization evolved into cloud, my skills and knowledge evolved, too: from hardware to VMware to cloud (with VMware) and then open-source cloud (with OpenStack), then containers, Docker, and now, most recently, the major public cloud providers. My day job the past year has been focused solely around complex deployments in AWS. How could I miss re:invent 2017?
So, I’m headed there next month. Yet, despite all my years attending VMWorld, I know re:Invent is definitely a conference in its own class. It requires advanced preparation in order to make the best of it.
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An Interview with Bernard Golden: How VMWorld Stacks up Against reInvent

By Ofir Nachmani, IOD CEO
I have known Bernard Golden for years, and it is always a pleasure to chat with him and hear his views about the enterprise IT industry, in general, and, of course, about cloud trends. Over the last decade, I’ve found that interviewing experts and influencers (whether at a conference or remotely) has proven to be both educational and beneficial. This conversation with Golden recently over Skype also gave me lots to think about, especially one month before AWS re:Invent 2017.
The purpose of the interview was to get his takeaways from the VMworld conference in August, which hosted close to 24,000 IT professionals. We discussed the atmosphere at VMworld, VMware’s attempts to stay relevant in the face of AWS’s rapid development, the current state of the ecosystem, and more.
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Roll Out Your Personal CI with Docker

The term Continuous Integration (CI) is no longer a fancy new topic in the industry. With the recent rise of such services as Travis or CircleCI, everyone can use a free CI server for their open-source projects or buy a paid support for private ones.
Catching bugs before they reach customers has never been easier provided you invest in some form of automated tests to run each time a code changes. Even though most of us have access either to the above-mentioned services or to the company’s CI servers, sometimes a personal CI system may also be helpful.
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